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Turn Post Traumatic Stress into Growth with Cathay Reta

Joining me today for this episode of Live. Love. Engage. (recorded live on Facebook) is Cathay Reta, a speaker and author of the book, “Keep Walking, Your Heart Will Catch Up.” The book details Cathay’s journey along the Camino de Santiago that she completed while celebrating her 65th birthday.

Cathay has offered a 20% off coupon for her book, Keep Walking (both paperback and ebook) for anyone who orders it from her website. (Link is found below) Enter coupon code: Gloriagracerand. This offer is good until the end of November, 2021.

On this episode of the Live. Love. Engage. podcast:

  • Why Cathay decided to walk the Camino
  • The importance of listening to the voice inside you
  • Why Cathay felt safe traveling alone
  • What she learned about herself during the process
  • Why Cathay recommends the journey to others

Connect with Cathay
Website: cathayreta.com

TRANSCRIPT

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Live. Love. Engage. Podcast: Inspiration | Spiritual Awakening | Happiness | Success | Life

TRANSCRIPT

Gloria Grace Rand
Namaste and welcome to Live Love, engage, and we are recording live today on Facebook. And I’ve been doing this a few Wednesdays so far. And I am delighted to really excited about today episode because I’ve got a guest who is going to be joining me right now. And we’re going to be having a really great discussion. So I want to first welcome Cathay Reta to live love, engage.

Cathay Reta
Thank you, Gloria. I’m really happy to be here. Looking forward to this also.

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah, well, I am delighted. So let me tell you a little bit about Cathay and why I’m so excited to have her on the show, we actually met at a publicity Summit. And she was promoting her book, which those of you who are watching on Facebook and are seeing this later on YouTube, we’ll see. But I’ll tell you about that in a second. But first off, let me tell you about Cathay. She’s got a bachelor’s in music, a 37 year career in adult literacy, spanning local statewide and national levels, and a lifetime of CO ministry with her late husband. And her greatest strength and passion is writing about life’s experiences and observations and turning them into relatable lessons for her readers. And in fact, the book that she wrote recently is called Keep Walking, Your Heart Will Catch Up. And she’s got other books in the works. But this I’m going to show you my copy of the book, which I just actually finished reading and the subtitle of the book is a Camino de Santiago journey. And this this journey first came to mind actually, I first became aware of it as something that people do back in, I think it was 2015. And it was when my sister was going through her cancer journey. I was out there in Tucson with her and we came across this movie called The Way I think it was with Martin Sheen and his son, I think Emilio actually and so it was about his pilgrimage walking the Camino. But I’m going to let Cathy tell us a little bit more about that. So tell us a little bit more about what this book is about, and why you wrote it.

Cathay Reta
Okay, I love to talk about it. The Camino, as we call it, the Camino de Santiago. It’s the Way of St. James. And it’s a walk that starts actually, there’s several paths that go from different cities in Europe and end up in Santiago, in Spain. And it’s very spiritual journey. Now I went on it because I’d heard about it during the time, the last few months of my husband’s life in 2016, a couple of our friends went on it. And it caught my attention. I thought, well, that’s great. I love to go walk it someday, but never expecting to but it’s always stayed in the back of my mind. Three years later, I actually got to do that. And it came up. I was on my 64th birthday. I was saying I should do something big for my 65th I want to do something special. And I thought I’ll walk the Camino. It’s like, yeah, it’s kind of glib and easy to say that. But then as the year progressed, I started walking and practicing longer hikes and getting ready for it. And it really wasn’t up to a few months before I left that I was for sure I was going to do it. And the intent was, this is a great way to have time undistracted to think about what am I going to do in my next 30 years. I’d been single about 30 years and I got married and my husband and I were together for 33 years so I thought okay, I’m I’m on to phase three my next 30 years. And so I expected it to be a very mental activity. Certainly physical with so much walking, it’s the full trail on the path I took was 483 miles. I didn’t get to walk all that myself but I did a good portion of it. And I thought this would be great time to think and plan. It turned out to be a real spiritual, a very emotional journey, which I hadn’t seen it coming at the beginning, not till I was pretty much in it that I realized that’s what its true value and its treasure was to me.

Gloria Grace Rand
So, what did you, what did you really learn about yourself in in the process of walking that?

Cathay Reta
I guess I got to learn, I maybe didn’t know myself as well as I thought, you know, the first night I was sitting in this old cathedral, it’s a 12th century church. And they had the music was softly playing and the lights were dim, and I started tearing up and I heard the word absolution. I thought, I don’t need absolution, I’m good with God, I’m confident I don’t get it. And I sat there. And then that voice, my spirit in me said, Yes, you need absolution to yourself from yourself. That kind of set the stage for the next 37 days walking. So I really didn’t realize that was an issue that I have problems. But you know, there’s something about the physical difficulty of walking. And it’s, you know, it’s not a level path, it’s up and down, and also different terrains and weather. And you really get broken down, and I was alone, I went on this alone. And it’s like the, I think, we all we tend to build shelves up around us, to protect us, but then they also are the, what holds us in and keeps us, you know, enslaved inside. And so that act of just that walking and being there alone started to break that open. And I started to get a glimpse of myself and understand that I carried a lot of guilt. And I’m not even aware of any specific things, what the guilt was, but I just knew it was in there, I didn’t need to forgive myself. And by the time I finished, I had done that. But I also early on one of the early days, I was walking up to this hill, they called its place of forgiveness. And as I was walking, I just suddenly knew I had to forgive David. It was like, I don’t want to do this, you know, and I thought, what unforgiveness could I have, you know, when someone dies, they don’t just choose to run off and leave you. But got to the top of the hill and I knew I had to deal with that. And I just verbally allowed forgave, forgave David for dying and leaving me with that, then, of course, I just cried a lot again. And it was a real cleansing. And I just felt a burden lift off of me. I didn’t know I was carrying that. And I’ve reflected a lot since then how we deal with death. And that transition in life that, you know, people, we don’t know how to deal with it. And so I did what kind of felt like I supposed to do say well just think he’s in a better place. And all these things we say he’s not suffering anymore, because he had had a difficult illnesses the last years of his life. And while that’s true, that doesn’t mean I’m not suffering, and I’m not hurting at the his loss at my loss with him going. So that just kind of relieved me of that being able to forgive him and to really process grief. And I learned that you have to process grief, you can’t ignore it, suppress it, it’s going to come out in different ways that’s going to hold you back. It’s really, I think what should be a treasured process I wish in this country would open up and accept it and embrace it more than it’s a transition in life, and nothing to be afraid of, or pushback at. And so that’s one of the central things I learned from this trip.

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah, that’s it’s so powerful. And it is so true that I think number one is that we all grieve in different ways for one thing, and but you’re right is that you’ve got to, you’ve got to deal with it, you’ve got to be able to let it out. Because if you try not to it, yeah, it can turn into anger, perhaps even at the wrong person. Because you’re you’re not processing it. And so it can explode that way or it can just come out and you know, big waves of of pain and and you know and crying when if you just let yourself do maybe more gentle crying along the way, it would be a lot better.

Cathay Reta
It’s powerful to express it and a big thing I learned after I got back home some time later, I was looking at some of my pictures from the trip. And there were two where I saw I had my head just thrown back in laughter. And I thought I don’t remember ever seeing myself like that. That was something new to me. And then later I heard on a podcast and I’ve read and learned about since then that when we suppress the emotions like that grief, that sorrow I felt when you suppress that you suppress emotion. You don’t get to pick out which emotions you’re going to express and which you’re going to keep hidden. So I realized, I think I’ve done a lot of suppressing through my life, I’ve tended to be very stoic and, and unemotional. And so that’s just packed everything down where even the joy and just being able to laugh so freely is something that did not come easily for me. So I’m still experiencing that learning. And now, but I think that’s another great gift I got from this journey.

Gloria Grace Rand
That’s awesome. And I can relate to that. Because I’ve experienced that myself. One of the other parts of the book that really struck me too was you’re navigating other people on the on the journey and like at first you, you kept saying that you sort of felt distant, like you didn’t belong? You and when you… Well, actually, let’s, let’s maybe explain that along the way, you’re not necessarily staying in hotels, you’re staying in hostels, and share a little bit about what, number one what that experience is, and then I’ll get back to this other part of it.

Cathay Reta
yeah, that’s the one of the beauty things a beautiful things of this trail is that it’s very well structured. And they’re hostels along the way, and some of them are large, and will have 40, 60, people stay in bunk beds very close together. And some others, are maybe private homes, where they’ve turned into a hostel and you still get seven or eight people. And what I’d always heard about and read about is how family is developed and how you make these tight connections on the community, you get to know people and you walk together. And I found… first I walk very slow. I don’t know how it is, but my, I’m short, my legs just don’t go as fast as others. And so I never got with a group that I stayed with. So, you know, I’ve been meeting different people that as you go along, sometimes cliques have already connected. And for whatever reason, this journey I was in at that time, I just wasn’t connecting with many people, I met a lot. And I had some great conversations and enjoyed people, but didn’t feel any tight connection. And sometimes I just felt, I just couldn’t find my place. Very awkward, but also took me back to my early years, my high school years where I was so shy. I found shyness translates as like being stuck up, and so people avoid you. And it’s not that at all, I’d be hurting that. So help me I couldn’t think of a thing to say, I couldn’t find any way to enter a conversation. And so it was kind of awkward for a long time. Then I did have some breakthroughs and find some ways to do that. But I think overall, most people I hear that do the Camino really makes form strong bonds with people. But I think for what was going on with me at the time, I got exactly what I got out of it exactly what I needed. So I have no regret about that.

Gloria Grace Rand
That’s good. Would you recommend that others, you know, do this walk? And and if so, why?

Cathay Reta
I think definitely if if I think it’d be beneficial and great for everyone. But I really think it’s something that you’re probably called to do. And if it’s calling to you, if you have the idea to do it, you know, who knows what you’re going to get out of it. So I think it’s a very unique experience for different people. I listen to some podcasts, where people are sharing about their experience, and it’s always very different, but often seems to be very healing. And in fact, they say that the path that follows actually follows the Milky Way. And some people say there’s like ley lines where there is a real spiritual happening that goes there. And I’ve kind of I choose to believe that it’s just kind of magic magical. And so you know, if you can lay out all your plans and what you’re going to do and what you’re going to get from it, but you don’t know till you’re there. And then you just let the Camino guide you let it unfold. And I think that’s part of the beauty of it because it can we find out what’s in it and what we need or whatever it may be what our strengths are. Find just learning to love ourselves. I think that’s the biggest thing that happens for a lot of people as they walk the Camino. I mean, there are others that walk it just for sport. It’s really nice, fun hike. There’s all different reasons for doing it. But I think most people even if they didn’t intend to have some spiritual experience, that’s what they end up getting out of it.

Gloria Grace Rand
What do you wish that you had known before setting out on your journey that might have made the experience either more enjoyable or just more, would have been have had an impact, let’s say

Cathay Reta
Before I left, that year or so, before I left, I started, I need to get in shape because I hadn’t done walking or hiking for years and years. And I overdid it, I just pushed too hard too fast, and I injured my heels. So I had pain in my Achilles heels before ever going. And, and I, for the longest time, I just kept working on it, well, they’ll get, you know, softened up, they’ll get used to it here soon, not realizing it was getting worse and worse. So that by the time I went, you know, like friends suggested, I should put it off a year because it’s not, it’s going to be hard to do with the painful and I was afraid of doing injury, further injury where I need surgery or something. So I was concerned about it. So I wish I’d known how to train more calmly, and in a practical way, and how to take care of myself better. But, you know, I did what I did. And when it was time to go, I even despite that, I knew I had to go that year – 2019. I didn’t you know, I thought about putting it off for a year, but I knew I couldn’t. And now I know, you know, I just so thankful I listened to that voice. Because 2020 it closed up, it would have happened. And I needed what I got out of it. Before I went, I named my feet. One is named blessed, and the other is lovely. And I promised them I would take care of them. I would listen to them, and not just push them around and demand the impossible out of them like I had done in years past but really start listening to my body and work together with it and not just be a bully to it.

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah, absolutely. And I could relate to that when you were talking about that, because I’ve I’ve done two marathons before in my life, and I think was it was the first one was the first one was second one. But I did get like plantar fasciitis in the middle of the training. And so I had to actually, yeah, I think was the second No, it was the first one I did. And I had to I, you were, you’re supposed to be able to do like the longest training was like 20 miles. And I wasn’t able to do it because it was just, I was in too much pain. And I was like, you know, really like I don’t know if I’m gonna be able to do the marathon now because I didn’t get my lung thing. But it was actually a really good thing that I didn’t do it because I was able to complete it, despite our longest training run might have been like 50 miles instead, instead of the 20.

Cathay Reta
That’s a big, big to do congratulations to you. I found on the Camino most people well, as a general rule, people will walk 12 to 16 miles a day, I was doing six to nine for the most part. And so that’s part of the beauty of it, too. There’s no you do your Camino, whatever you can do. But I did have a couple of 13 mile days. And, you know, I mean, it was painful. It was hard. But it felt really good, but I know, in the situation I was in, I couldn’t have maintained that every day. So you go and you just do what you can and just make it work for you.

Gloria Grace Rand
I think that is a beautiful lesson. And and what inspires me to think that I could do it because I, as I said, I you know, I first heard about this back in 2015. And then I had a coach who did it a couple of years ago, I think maybe 2018 or something. And I was like Oh, wow. I was like oh, yeah, that’s cool. So I know that when Yeah, when when the time is right that I will I really do feel that it’s, it’s in my future, I’m going to do it. Because I’d also had… Well my daughter and I had talked for a while about doing part of the Appalachian Trail. And because we had hiked together here in Florida for a while and hiking some local trails. But it’d be interesting. I wonder if I could even talk her into possibly doing it with me. Although, if we did it together, she would probably leave me in the dust because she’s got longer legs and she walks fast. And so I would probably wind up you know, be like you

Cathay Reta
it’s beautiful. I met a Mother/Daughter, a couple and others on the trail that really worked well, where they maybe start out in the morning and decide where they’re going to meet at night, which town they’ll stop in. And then they separate during the day. They’re each at their own pace and having that solitude and kind of really beneficial for them and then they meet up in the evening or maybe a couple of days later. So you can go back and forth or I met one mother daughter where the mother would walk as far as she could and then take a taxi to the next stop and meet her daughter there and the daughter would walk the whole way and there’s beautiful that was beautiful, but what great time you would have what a…

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah, it would be cool. So maybe I can maybe I can persuade her. It probably wouldn’t take too much because she does like to do things like this and she does like to hike. And it would be nice to have company at least part part of the time and to share that. Oh, and that was the other thing that you just mentioned, which I was also surprised about is that you can, you know, you don’t have to feel like you have to walk the whole way. Because you did actually get you got on a bus a couple of times, right?

Cathay Reta
I did. There are purists which would say, that’s not fair. And that’s cheating. And my first thought about I felt a little guilty, but then it’s back to, you know, are you going to quit, or you’re going to knock yourself out and kill yourself over trying to do something that’s going to damage your body. And the first time I took the bus, I was in a plaza and I was talking with this couple from Ireland, and I had this awful foot pain. And then I just gotten a huge blister on the bottom of my foot. And she said, Oh, well, you should do what so and so does, she you know, she takes the bus part of the way, and she took me over to meet her, she was sitting in the plaza also. And so we talked about I thought, huh, the bus, you can do that? So I did the next morning, and then I tried to do it as minimal as possible. But in the middle there; I was 37 days on the trail. And then I got to the point, I’m looking at the calendar, I can’t walk the whole thing and make it back to get my flight home. So I had to cut out a chunk of it. And I’d love to go back and finish that part someday. But, you know, I would have loved to say I walked the whole thing. And I knew it would be beautiful. But I still know I got out of what I needed at that time with where I was.

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah, absolutely. And that’s, I think that’s more important than doing the whole thing is that you did you got out of it what you needed to. And you did finish and you did get your certificate, right. Yeah. Tell tell our audience a little bit about that. That last, I guess it was about about two days or something that last journey because you’d had this nice break with not many people. And then things changed a little bit, right?

Cathay Reta
Yeah, you know, there’s some books about the Camino that talk about it. To get your certificate that Compostella you have to walk the last number from Sarria, which this is one town escapes now is that the last like 60 Some miles. And so a lot of people just walk through Sarria to Santiago. But a lot of other of us have been walking for, you know, a few hundred miles already and weeks. And so when we’re used to solitude is like, Oh, it’s a very spiritual journey that we’re on. And we’re walking in this and you get to Sarria, and suddenly, there’s more people on the trail and they’re loud. They get on there, you know, just fresh and new and they’re not tired out like some of us. And you have to watch that you don’t get a resentment against them. And, man, they’re kind of messing up my pilgrimage here being so loud and laughing. And so I had to get over that, you know, everyone has their own pilgrimage. So even if they can only have the time to do from Sarria, to the Santiago, that’s their business, that’s okay. So you kind of struggle a little bit, but learn to be welcoming, and try to be accepting of everyone. Although there is one gentleman. So I’m going along, it’s my last day, and I’m just suffering that I’m going along. So I’m doing my slow walk, which to me is walking as fast as I can. And he comes running by and laughing. And in Spanish, he tells me Oh, hurry up, it’s gonna take you two weeks to get there. And, you know, he had his children with him, and they’re laughing and I just kind of smiled at him. But inside I’m thinking, you have no right. You don’t know what I’ve been through, you know, you just hopped off the bus somewhere, you know, skipping along here and going on and on. And I wish I’d had the nerve to say that, but I didn’t. I was soft spoken and just smiled and went on. But I took from that saying, You know what, no one knows what journey someone else is on. And we’re often so quick to judge someone and to say things where we had really do well to be quiet because we don’t know what struggle they have or what they’re going through at the time.

So there’s so many, many, many lessons like that on the way that I picked up. I think one of the one of the biggest one was learning to love myself. And again, I didn’t know that was an issue, but I knew I had struggled for the first three weeks. And And now, don’t let this scare you off Gloria. Doesn’t happen to many, but some people get bedbugs. And I’m one of them. So I was dealing with that. It’s kind of like the last straw. I just wanted to pack up and go home. And I was in the hostel. I had washed my clothes all day and trying to get rid of it. And this gentleman comes in he’s from the UK and he put his bed roll on the bunk bed. And that’s how’s your day going? Now I said, I’ve got bed bugs. So I want to go home and I started crying. He was so sweet. And he said, Can I hold your hand? And he took my hand, he sat on the floor next to my bed and just started consoling me saying, You know it’s just part of life is probably the experience. And I don’t know what all he said. But I just felt really comforted. And we walked around that evening. And, you know, he seemed just like a therapist, or a counselor, I learned he was a mechanical engineer from the UK, but just so kind. And at one point, he stopped and said, You’re here on the Camino, to learn to fall in love with yourself again. And it’s like uh, that… Yeah, that hit me. And I knew that was exactly right. When I got rid of the bedbugs had a wonderful experience at another hostel where I was so taken care of, and just rested and had such a good experience. And it just kind of renewed my energy. And off I went, and I finished the trail. I can really say I love myself.

Gloria Grace Rand
What a blessing and a gift that he was able to give to you. And that then you gave to yourself in doing in doing this walk. One other thing I wanted to touch on, and I because I think also, sometimes we hear stories about I’m going to say, the dangers and I’m doing air quotes here for for those listening, dangers of traveling, you know, as a woman alone, and you’re going through, you know, a country you’re walking, you’re going through different towns, and how did how did you? Did you have any, you know, fears about that, even at the beginning or through it? And how did you manage that?

Cathay Reta
You know, I was never afraid of that. And I think it was even a more powerful experience to be able to go alone. Even being a woman alone, I think there are enough people walking on the trail that you don’t feel so alone. I guess I felt safer there than I would a lot of places back around home, I wouldn’t be out walking by myself. And well, no, I do. I still do that too, in the parks and on trails. But I think there there’s something real special about it. And I have heard that occasionally there is an incident with a woman, but I think it’s very rare. And while I had periods of time where I was, you know, two, maybe three hours alone without anyone passing me or not seeing anyone. For the most part, it’s not that far away, someone’s maybe an hour or two before they’re along. And I just think there’s I think the towns and the people along that trail, are very proud of the Camino passing through there. And they kind of look after the pilgrims; we’re called pilgrims. And I think they’re very caring for them. So I feel very safe about it. I wouldn’t have any hesitation for a woman going alone.

Gloria Grace Rand
That’s good. Is there anything else that I haven’t asked you about that you think would be worthy to share here? In the time we’ve got left?

Cathay Reta
You know, one thing I, when I set out, I thought it was going to be a chance to think about what I want to do with my next 30 years. I never got time to think about that it was so much experiencing it and going through it. But what I look back and I realized it’s kind of like the Wizard of Oz experience with Dorothy having the shoes and the answer already. I already knew. I’ve known for years what to do with my life. And then it’s be a writer and a speaker and I’ve wanted to pursue that and I haven’t. So all I needed to do was to get the courage to pursue it. And maybe that’s part of that learning to love myself and believe in myself that I have now. So I really did get that out of it too. But it’s something I’ve known for a long time. I just didn’t have the I guess the courage to go and jump in and do it. Because that’s what I would encourage people you know, you have that voice inside telling you what to do and leading you and guiding you and situations keep coming up and then you back off of it. Don’t wait. Just go ahead and jump into it. lean into it. And follow your heart, your hearts purpose, that purpose which you know, that’s been calling you and speaking to you.

Gloria Grace Rand
Ah, good lessons. Yeah, I I appreciate you saying that because it’s, we need to hear that and sometimes we need to hear it a lot clearer The first I don’t know, two 3, 20 times.

Cathay Reta
Yeah, I just yesterday, I was telling someone I’m doing now I’m 67 I’m doing now what I, gosh, I wish I had been doing it 20 years ago, 30 years ago, then I’d be a lot further along. And, you know, on one hand might look and say, well, he missed out on it. No, it’s not too late, then I’ll jump in it now and get all I can out of it.

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, there’s been so many numerous instances of people who have started new careers and things were well, you know, in their 50s 60s, even even later, so it’s never too late. And you’re proof of that. And I’m delighted that you’re doing that, and pursuing, you know, writing and speaking, and I hope you’ll continue to do so. And you. You mentioned, I think we talked about this briefly before we started the broadcast that you have, you’ve got like another book, too, that you’ve you’ve written as well, or some other things.

Cathay Reta
It was a book, it’s called Joy Unfolding. It’s messages for women. You know, the other thing that happened at this time, I’ve been going through the transition, I left the ministry group I’ve been a part of for 45 years. And a number of us did. And I knew some women were, you know, we were kind of really struggling and finding our way. And so I was writing to them, and prophecies wife that the Lord would have me say to them, and I got copies of them and put them together in a book because I realized, though a message may be specific for one person, it can speak to everyone. And I realized probably more than anything that was God speaking to me, encouraging me where maybe I couldn’t hear it directly. But when it’s going to someone else, I think sometimes that’s the way we listen best when we’re eavesdropping on what’s being said to someone else, and we can apply it to ourselves as well. And I think that’s kind of what this book is. So it’s called Joy Unfolding, and Messages for the Guarded Heart.

Gloria Grace Rand
I love that. Yeah, that and that is so true. Because I know when I first had my idea to write my book, I thought it was just going to be a book for, you know, for people, you know, wasn’t wasn’t thinking that it was, oh, no, it was a book really, for me first for me to learn the lesson, and then I can teach other people. So yeah. I love how God works that way. Yeah, absolutely. Oh, and I just realized, and I didn’t do that. But I’m going to put my little ticker symbol up here right now. But I’m going to invite you to share with our listeners, for those who can’t see the video, if someone wants to be able to get in touch with you learn more about your books, and what you’re up to what is the best way for folks to connect with you?

Cathay Reta
you can go right to my website. So it’s my name, cathayreta.com. And you see it displayed there. And you can purchase the books there, or they’re also available on Amazon. I also have a blog that comes out weekly. And so I invite you to subscribe to the blog. It’s kind of short. But you know, in the past, I’ve included some of those words for women from Joy Unfolding. And I did actually last summer, a series of day by day, the Camino showing some pictures and just a brief writing about what was happening. And so if you want to go look at the Archive of it, there’s something there for you. And now I’m just kind of writing each week. This is new for me just something current or what comes to me each week. So instead of having something lined out ahead of time, I’m just kind of trusting my Okay, what am I going to come up with this week. And so there’s some, you know, brief writings on there. So I would love for you to connect with me. There’s also a contact form where you can send me a message or email me at Cathay at Cathayreta.com. I’d love to hear from you and connect with you.

Gloria Grace Rand
All right, excellent. Well, thank you so much for speaking with us today. I’m so glad that we met and I definitely want to stay in touch with you. Because yeah, we you and I have a lot of some similarities, I think in some of the things in our in our life that we’ve experienced, and certainly, I think our maybe thoughts and beliefs about things. I think in particular, the same life path, but but there’s some there’s some

Cathay Reta
there’s some similarities and I think I read in your book that you also played flute.

Gloria Grace Rand
I did play flute. Yes. Okay, very good.

Cathay Reta
Yeah, I feel like you’re a kindred spirit. I’ve really enjoyed talking with you. Thanks for inviting me today.

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah, well, thank you. for being here, I really appreciate it. And thank you everyone for watching and for listening today. And I really am grateful for that. And I hope that you will continue to check out our podcast we have new episodes come out every Friday, and then some new ones on Monday as well. Now, not every Monday, but next Monday for sure, because that’s when this one will, will come out. And so you can catch us on all the major podcast platforms, as well as find us here on Facebook. Most Wednesdays we’ll see how this continues. So, until next time, as always, I encourage you to go out and live fully love deeply and engage authentically

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About the Author
Known as The Insightful Copywriter, Gloria Grace Rand is also an inspirational speaker, author and host of the Live. Love. Engage. podcast. Prior to launching her SEO Copywriting business in 2009, Gloria spent nearly two decades in television, most notably as writer and producer for the award-winning PBS financial news program, “Nightly Business Report.”

Gloria turned to writing as a way to communicate, since growing up with an alcoholic father and abusive mother taught her that it was safer to be seen and not heard. But not speaking her truth caused Gloria problems such as overeating, control issues, and an inability to fully trust people. After investing in coaching & personal development programs, and studying spiritual books like “A Course in Miracles,” Gloria healed her emotional wounds. Today, she helps entrepreneurs develop clarity, confidence and connection to the truth of who you are, so you can create a business that has more impact, influence and income!

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