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Veronique Ory’s Blueprint for Mindfulness and Well-Being

Are you searching for a blueprint to bring your mind and body into harmony for overall well-being? You’ll want to tune in and find out Veronique Ory’s secret for achieving a state of optimal mental and physical health.

Show Notes | Transcript

“We want to be in the space where there’s these growth edges, where we feel like we’re being challenged in a way that feels exciting and maybe a little bit scary.” – Veronique Ory    

Veronique Ory is a registered yoga teacher with a passion for storytelling and creative movement. With her unique sequences, she invites her students to carry their yoga practice beyond the mat. Veronique is also the author of the one-of-a-kind interactive yoga book, Shine On and off the Mat. This book combines storytelling, playlists, on-demand classes, journal prompts, and photos to take readers on a supported, self-paced yoga journey. Veronique’s love for movement and storytelling began in her grandparents’ living room, where she would put on shows for them, using song and dance as a way to bring the whole family together. Her journey led her to discover yoga, which became a powerful tool for managing stress and finding inner calm. With her focus on the why behind the movement, Veronique creates intelligent sequences that connect the mind, body, and spirit.

In this episode, you will be able to:

  • Boost your focus and productivity by understanding the impact of technology on attention.
  • Set boundaries to reclaim your time and maintain a healthy work-life balance.
  • Discover the power of deciding when and how you are available to others for better mental and physical well-being.
  • Prioritize your mental and physical health to experience greater happiness and fulfillment in life.
  • Navigate the challenges of living in a hyper-connected world and find strategies to stay grounded and centered.

Related Live. Love. Engage. episodes you may enjoy:

Tap into Optimal Well-Being: Exploring EFT Tapping with Monique Verpoort

How to Prioritize Well-Being and Find Harmony in Business with Christine Franklyn

Neil McKinlay: Healing Through Meditation and Community

Meditation is the Path to Self-Love

Resources:

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Join the Soulful Women’s Network here

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Live. Love. Engage. Podcast: Inspiration | Spiritual Awakening | Happiness | Success | Life

TRANSCRIPT

Gloria Grace Rand
Namaste. I am so glad to be with you for another edition of Live Love Engage, and I want to welcome those of you who are here perhaps for the very first time, whether you’re watching on YouTube or listening, and if you’re a regular subscriber yay. I’m so glad that you’re back because we’re going to have a good show today. And if you are new, just to give you a little bit more background about me and who I am, I am Gloria Grace, the light messenger and spiritual alignment coach and women entrepreneurs hire me to clear the inner blocks, keeping you stuck so you can live the life you want now. And today’s guest is definitely somebody who is in alignment with that and is definitely interested in helping you live a great life right now. And her name is Veronique Ory and she is a registered yoga teacher with a passion for storytelling and creative movement and with unique sequences. She invites her students to carry their yoga practice on and off the mat. And she’s also an author. She has a new book called Shine On and off the Mat and it’s a one of a kind interactive yoga book that syncs its storytelling with playlists on demand classes, journal prompts and photos, all while taking the reader through a supported, self paced yoga journey. Which sounds fabulous, and I’m definitely going to be asking her all about that. So without further ado, I’m going to go ahead and bring Veronique on to Live Love Engage. So welcome to the show.

Veronique Ory
Thank you so much, Gloria. Happy to be here.

Gloria Grace Rand
Well, I am definitely intrigued about this book because certainly I love the interactive nature of it. But before we get to that, I do love asking our guests to share with our listeners and our viewers a bit about their story and what got you to where you are today. So where did this passion for yoga come from?

Veronique Ory
Yes, I have always been drawn to movement and storytelling with the body, and my journey started as early as I can remember in my grandparents living room doing song and dance. They loved to have their living room as my own personal stage and they were living in Toronto at the time. And I had, by that point, moved to Albany, New York, from originally Montreal, and so it was one of the ways that they felt like they could stay in contact. So they had this double tape deck and an Elvis Presley microphone and I would sing Somewhere Over the Rainbow or one of the Hungarian songs that they taught me, and I would do a show specifically for them. And I really loved to make them laugh. And it brought the whole family together and it was the initial seed of this connection piece of here we all are together. And there’s an uplifted quality to it through song, through dance, through storytelling. And it really carried me through it was really clear to me when I was choosing my major that I was really drawn to theater. And so I studied theater at Russell Sage College, which was at the time an all women’s college. And I had a fairly long career pursuing acting, where I started my own nonprofit theater company when I was 22 years old. And I produced published plays that had won Tony Awards and Pulitzer Prize winning plays and produced revivals of those in Los Angeles and then later in New York and did that for 17 years. And sort of in the thick of the anxiety that I was living in, living in New York, I found yoga quite by accident and maybe also not by accident. I was living with my roommate Matt at the time, and all of the subways had closed for Hurricane Sandy, and we were feeling a little bit ready to go outside and experience fresh air. And we had heard that the local yoga studio had opened up, and he could have said anything, do you want to go outside for a walk? And I would have said yes. And it happened to be, do you want to go to a yoga class? And it was one of those fateful moments where I showed up and I felt like everything that I was and still am passionate about came together in this way that felt really uplifting and grounding. It was one of the first times that I felt really connected to my breath, and it was one of the first times that I felt really calm through my whole body. I think I had become really adept at thinking that I was managing stress well. And what I think happens is when we’re operating in a pace, and I think particularly if we’re living in an urban environment, we’re sort of like in this marathon pace. And it isn’t until we slow down that we start to really attune to how stressed we actually are. And so that class was a really great awakening for me where I realized, like, oh, I’m actually not managing my stress very well. I’m just operating so quickly that I’m not aware of it. And so I started to really unpack that. And what I really loved about the creative flows and the music and the movement coming together is that creativity piece and that connection piece. And so it really does all stem from my grandparents living room of feeling that coming together in this way that is a self expression. And then ultimately it’s like just feeling good mind, body and spirit coming together. And yoga is a really perfect fit for that.

Gloria Grace Rand
Well, I love that. And I’ve just discovered that we have something in common, actually, a couple of things in common, because when I was a kid, I loved to dance as well and sing. So I took ballet lessons, tap lessons, jazz lessons. But I have Hungarian ancestry as both my grandparents were born in Hungary, and I even had the pleasure of being able to go to Budapest a couple years ago, too. So I got to even travel to the town where my grandfather was born. So it was really cool. So. Yeah, I like that. I love a name. This brings me together with people that I can really connect with. I love that story of how you well, number one, I’m very impressed with the work that you were doing even before you got into yoga. Being able to produce plays at such a young age and running a theater company. That’s amazing. And I appreciate, too, you’re talking about the stress level and not really fully appreciating it until you got to be still and then recognizing that. So talk to me about and share with our listeners a little bit more, though, about because you’re definitely unique in that. And I love that your name is Veronique, but this idea of really marrying yoga with storytelling and then maybe you can even get into how you decided to actually put that into a what? Really? How does that mean? First of all, I guess let’s talk about that a little bit.

Veronique Ory
I love that so oftentimes when we in the west go to a yoga class and it could be at a gym or the Y or community center, sometimes at a yoga studio, the focus is on the physical practice. We’re showing up. We’re putting body into shapes. And one of the things that I was really curious about and was represented really well for me at the yoga studios that I practice at in New York, both the Yoga Room and Pure Yoga West, was this attention to the why, right? So there’s a theme. So there’s a connection of why it is we’re moving in the way that we’re moving. And I love the Mind Meal, so something for us to chew on as we’re moving through the things. And so it takes a certain skill set, I think, for a teacher to do this in a way that isn’t overt, but it’s rather you might not even be aware of it, but you’ll discover that perhaps you’re thinking, about something in your life that the teacher planted the seed for. And then it’s something that you can really tune into in terms of your yoga, off of the mat. So one of the themes that I really love to come back to is slowing down, which I feel like I can never re remember enough, right. And that can show up in if you’re moving through sun salutation, say it’s like, how slowly can you raise your arms up and how slowly can you raise your arms down so that there’s an intention and there’s a purpose to the movement. And so it’s really a meditation in the movement. And when we’re focusing on something that isn’t in connection with the movement, it really helps sink into this meditative state that helps circumvent all of the thoughts that want to try to interrupt where we currently are. And it’s a really powerful tool, particularly if you’re one that struggles with just sitting. And here I am, I’m deciding to meditate in this moment, finding just a little bit of light movement with an attention to why it is I’m moving in this way. And so it could be through a story. So one of the ways that I really love to do this is having sort of the outline of something that’s going on in my life, because oftentimes, if I’m going through something, the umbrella theme of that is universal to all of us. We’re all very connected in a universal way. So oftentimes, if I’m feeling overwhelmed, I’ll be talking to people, and readily everyone I talk to is also overwhelmed. And so that can be the overarching theme of how to navigate through the overwhelm. And so you think about, okay, let’s focus on one thing, right? So figuring out a way to navigate the direction or the energy that we want to be aligning with. And so in that way, the connection to the movement could be just like very singularly focused, trying to wiggle just your big toes and no other toes, so certain things like that. So there’s a really nice connection of the why we’re moving, the way that we’re moving. And so it’s intelligent sequencing that has that container of the story. And the hope is that that story, that attention, that theme, it resonates in a way that you’re thinking about that following the class. And so that’s the yoga off the mat. So in that space of overwhelm, and then you get into your car and you’re driving to the thing, and then you’re like, running through the thoughts, the hope is that you start to develop an awareness of that happening. And then you think, okay, I can breathe in this moment. I can focus on my two hands on the wheel. Right? And that’s the meditation. As you’re driving you’re in an overwhelming state while you’re in a conversation with your partner, your mother, your best friend, your daughter, whoever. I’m focusing on simply listening to my loved one, to this stranger who I just met, this acquaintance, whoever, and here I am, I’m in this meditation with this conversation. So it’s all connected. And so the hope is that the storytelling is a thread, so that it really has this lasting impression in all that you do.

Gloria Grace Rand
That’s very interesting as I’ve taken yoga classes in the past and so it sounds to me as if correct me if I’m wrong it seems like that when you are approaching a class, you focus first on what is the story that we want to focus on today and then that dictates, then the different exercises and things that you would do. Is that correct?

Veronique Ory
Absolutely, yeah. I often will sit in meditation and think, okay, what is the energy that I’m leaning into what feels resonant for me. And so then I’ll embody that and so in creative flow, so oftentimes I’ll put on music and I’ll just move intuitively in my space, and then that becomes the scaffolding of the class. So each movement is very much influenced by the teaching overall of what is the energy I want you to feel, or I invite you to feel. And how can the story be a tether as you’re moving through the movements, as you’re breathing through this sequence?

Gloria Grace Rand
Cool. So what prompted you then to create a book? And then how did you, I guess, decide to come up with not just have it be a regular, say, instructional manual on here’s, how to do yoga, here are the different postures, but to really make it more of an interactive tool.

Veronique Ory
I live in a really small town. So oftentimes I would be out and about and I would run into my students and my clients at different places, and they would say, oh my gosh, the story you told in class yesterday, last week, I just keep thinking about it and it really resonates. And have you ever thought about writing your stories down? And I initially was resistant. I said it’s very much in the moment for me, and it’s intuitive and improvisational in a way. I don’t script them out ahead of time. I really feel into the energy of the room. And so that’s why oftentimes my students will say, how did you know exactly what I needed to hear? It’s because I’m really feeling into the collective energy in this space. And so after many people would come up to me and say how much they really enjoy my stories, I thought, well, let me just start writing them down. And so I just started writing them down, actually seven weeks before the pandemic started. And I thought it would be more like a journal, a private memoir of sorts. And then when all of the studios, and in fact many of the businesses closed, I saw a really great clearing. And I thought the silver lining of the closures to really tap into this space to write the story down. And I saw the book really clearly right away. I really saw in one fell swoop it came to me, this book that was a coffee table style book. I wanted people to be able to skim it at a glance. And I also wanted it to be something that they could pour into if they had more time, so that it’s really accessible and because we all learn in different ways, I really love the video component of the classes and wanting each of the classes to be really accessible in terms of timing. So each of the classes are just 20 minutes long. There’s a guided meditation, which you could do seated, lying down, walking your dog, driving to wherever. And then there’s a Vinyasa style class which is more the breath with the movement. It’s a bit more of an energetic practice. And then there’s a yin style class, which is very chill mellow, you’re lying down or you’re seated. It’s really accessible for everyone. And then the hope is that you could do them at different times, or you have the option to do all three back to back, and that would be a 60 minutes practice. I received a lot of compliments about my music playlist. I love a coffee house chill kind of vibe. And so I love that kind of music for the yoga practice, where the lyrics aren’t overt in terms of overpowering, but if you listen in, there’s really beautiful lyrics. And so I’ve heard from my students, sometimes they’ll listen to the playlist while they’re doing the laundry or washing the dishes, and that becomes a yoga practice that all of a sudden this chore that seems like, I got to get through this thing. All of a sudden it’s like, oh, this is actually really pleasant, and I could move through these things in a way that feels a little bit more easeful, a little bit more relaxed. And then I love the journal prompt as a component so that you have the opportunity to share your own story within my story and that you can really tap into this universal connection that we all have. And then the hope is that you keep the journal, and then when you circle back this time next year, you can see where you were this time last year, and you can witness the change and the evolution and the shifts that have happened over time. And it could be through the movement, through the meditation, through the music, through the reading, looking at the photographs, or you can choose. So I really like to think of it as a choose your own adventure. You can sample all the different components or choose the one that resonates. Similarly, you can do them in the sequence as I wrote them, or one of my favorite practices to do is to close the book and then open it to a random page, and then that’s the practice for the day. So there’s different ways to practice with it. And the hope is that you open it and choose from it what serves you, what resonates for you.

Gloria Grace Rand
I love that. And you mentioned something interesting, which I don’t know if people caught, but I did, and I think it perhaps stems to maybe people have a particular perception about what yoga is. And you mentioned that some of your clients would be listening to the playlist while they’re doing other chores, but you said that they were doing yoga, but there might be doing laundry. So can you elaborate? How can people say what wait a minute. How is doing laundry practicing yoga?

Veronique Ory
Absolutely. So there’s the yoga that most of us in the west associate with, of someone putting their foot behind their head or doing something very hypermobile or even just here I am in these different shapes. That’s one of the eight limbs of the yoga practice. So the yoga practice is very multifaceted. If you’re interested, you could certainly dive into research on this in terms of how it applies to this keyhole or this pathway into embodying yoga in all that you do. So like this capital Y yoga, it’s a mindfulness practice. And so certainly meditation is one component of the yoga practice. And maybe big picture is finding mindfulness in all that you do. And so that could be in errands, it could be in conversations, it could be in the way that you greet the day. And so there’s more of an attentiveness to your breath to actually doing the thing that you’re doing. So it’s like really committing to mind, body and spirit, being in the moment with all that you do, which certainly is a practice. It’s very natural to be we’ve all done this, right? We’re driving somewhere and then all of a sudden we realize we’ve missed our turn like eight minutes ago. So it’s natural for the mind to wander, to get distracted to thinking about something else. And our mind is completely somewhere dislocated from where our body is. And so part of what I really love to do is highlight an awareness of when that happens and an attentiveness to draw us back to the now. So it’s like you recall it and you come back without judgment, without trying to make a big fuss about it, but it’s just really finding these moments to thoughtfully and with curiosity acknowledge where we’ve traveled to. And there’s a lot of insight there we can start to track, okay, I keep thinking about this thing that happened ten years ago. Why do I keep replaying this thing that has happened? And we add more fuel to the fire in doing that. And there’s great use in that, right? Not trying to spiritually bypass through the things that have happened or trying to be blanket, statement positive about all things. That’s not what this is about. This is more an attunement and awareness to what is happening in real time. And when you feel ready to transition to the here and the now that you do so with curiosity, with wonderment, with awe, and finding a certain peacefulness around the things that you can’t change. And coming into the now in a space of, what I like to say, comfortably uncomfortable, right? We want to be in the space where there’s these growth edges, where we feel like we’re being challenged in a way that feels exciting and maybe a little bit scary. That’s when we know that we’re in this path of continual growth and so navigating through that space, that’s the hope that we’re never really in balance. It’s a little bit of a fallacy, but we want a perfect imbalance where we’re flirting on the edges of the fray of what that looks like and it could look like standing on one foot and you’re finding the balance physically. And then also maybe you’re finding the balance of meal prep for the week. And when are your meditation practices going to happen? And when are you carving space with your loved ones? When are you carving space to be with yourself? So it’s finding where your deepest heart’s intentions are and then how to mindfully navigate through all of it.

Gloria Grace Rand
Wow, so much good stuff there that you’re sharing. I love that. And I was going to ask you what would be like one clear benefit of doing a yoga practice, but I think you’ve pretty much answered that question. So I’m not even going to worry about asking you that. But I am going to ask you instead, is, is there a commonly held belief about yoga that you passionately disagree with?

Veronique Ory
So the most common thing I hear is I can’t do yoga because I’m not flexible. And oftentimes that’s exactly why one would get the most benefit of a yoga practice. Oftentimes too, right. The way that we are physically, it manifests how we are mentally, emotionally, spiritually. It’s often said the way we do one thing is the way we do everything. So if you’re feeling really tight in your hamstrings, in your hips, maybe you’re holding on really tightly to the past in some way. Maybe you’re holding really tight to having a certain order in your home. Right? And so where can we allow the yoga practice, the physical practice, or the meditation practice to maybe loosen the grip on things little by little and oftentimes the tension or the things that we hold on to? So I think of it as if you had a really ambitious notion to grab all the grocery bags from the cart and travel them into your car. It’s like you got to put them down, right? The tension that we’re holding on to, we are actually holding on to it. And so when we decide to let that go, then what can you create space for that actually feels freeing, that feels more open, that feels more expansive. And the tension has really great teachers in there, right. So oftentimes if you arrive to a yoga practice and you’re really hyper mobile, you might actually be doing more harm just kind of dumping into your flexibility. If you have some tension, you’re actually in a really great space to learn about your body. You can’t overstretch because you have certain physical restrictions. And so you can more thoughtfully come into it little by little and with consistency. That does open up. And I’ve seen that so many times with my clients, right? We’re starting out and it feels impossible. You’re laying down on your back to bring your arms to the ground and then you try that, say three times a week for five minutes with breath, with attention, with awareness, and little by little, I like to think of it as a remembering. We’re all born into this world fairly gumby like just like super mobile, super flexy. And we’ve learned this behavior between if we’re sitting in chairs most of the time or depending on what activities that you were drawn to or continuing to be drawn to, there’s a learned physicality that shifts as we age. And so I always like to think of this flexibility that we seek as remembering to our innate state that we’re allowing the body to come back to this expanse of nature. And that’s the fountain of youth. When we can stand up really tall and the spine is uplifted, the heart is open, it’s really difficult to be in a bad mood when we’re up, right. And it feels a little bit easier to be down, depressed, introverted, if we’re kind of like rounding in and collapse. And so as much as possible as that remembering to find the opening in those spaces little by little and it takes some consistent practice and also it’s really worthwhile, right. It affects the whole holistic health, mind, body and spirit.

Gloria Grace Rand
Absolutely. And you’re encouraging me to get back to it because I know when I was practicing yoga consistently, I did see and it wouldn’t even take that long. Maybe just a matter of a couple of weeks of like I found myself being able to hold poses longer or being able to stand on 1ft. And especially I had broken my right ankle years ago and so it tends to be a little WOBLY, but even that would get better. And I would be able to really especially when you focus on another spot. So you’re focusing on the spot, not necessarily focusing on the ankle, and then you’re able to be able to hold the position. So I’m glad that you mentioned that. Well, frankly, it’s like anything, if you want to get good at it, you do need to practice. It takes persistence and consistency and you do get more flexible. And frankly, as we age, that’s something that you really do need to spend more time encouraging that, I guess, encouraging that flexibility. And so, yes, I need to get back to doing a yoga practice. So I’m going to ask you one question about that, is if someone is listening to this and saying, yeah, maybe I need to start off with that, what would you recommend someone to do to be able to if they want to be able to start learning yoga, do they just find a local studio? Can they go online and look something up? What would you suggest to people do?

Veronique Ory
I think it’s really unique to each person. In general, I would say start small so that you can come into it for longevity.

Gloria Grace Rand
Right. Don’t overwhelm yourself.

Veronique Ory
Get excited. Almost like the first of the year, like I’m doing these New Year’s resolutions and I’m crushing it. And then by maybe January 2 or maybe February 1, we tend to kind of peter out and it feels like, overwhelming. Like, oh my gosh, I went really full throttle and then I’ve burnt out. I’ve maxed out of what my capacity is. So I really love to say start small. Start with just a few minutes for as many days as you feel is feasible for you. So I really love the idea of allowing the phone to be on silent or on airplane mode for as long as you can possibly manage to connect upward. Right? So source, God, whatever you believe in, find either a seat to breathe or it doesn’t have to be complicated. It could be a seat to just take some little twists, connect some breath with movement. Maybe you turn on your favorite song while you’re brushing your teeth and you just kind of move into your body. It doesn’t have to be a specific yoga sequence. It doesn’t have to be you going anywhere. It can just be you in your space before you connect to the outside world, where you allow yourself to embody yourself as you are. And if you feel like you want a little bit of guidance, I do have a five minute morning routine video series that you can sign up for on my website. And then you’ll get an email in your inbox every morning with a little five minute video, and you can come into it. They’re really gentle stretches and movements. If you feel like you don’t know how to move and you want a little bit of guidance, that’s there for you. If you want a longer class, one of the things that I’d mentioned before, which is really great, is that connection of my On Demand series, which is on my Vimeo channel. You can also link to that on my website, and those are just 20 minutes classes, which I think is a really great amount of time where you can steep into that state of being. And it really does affect the entire day when we tap into that connection to ourselves at the beginning of the day before we allow outside stimulus to usurp, our entire energy. It really is amazing. I think of it as like this superhero force field that the triggers can come and they more readily just roll off of our backs when we’ve filled ourselves up in a way that feels uplifted and grounded.

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah, absolutely. I know I have taken to putting my phone on silent in the morning, and it’s like, I just want to do the things, do my regular routine that I have in the morning, whether it’s walking and meditating and journaling and then even dealing with mundane things like emptying the litter box for my cats. Because I figure eventually, once I start the workday, then I can maybe turn it back on again. But it’s been really nice not having to hear, you know, somebody’s texting me or a Facebook message or something. It’s like, no, this is my time for myself. And so I’m really appreciative of you for mentioning that for folks, and I think you gave them really spot on advice for how to get started. So thank you so much for that.

Veronique Ory
You’re welcome. Yeah, it’s really great. I had a teacher explain the notifications to me once that really resonated. She said it’s as if you’re in a moment and someone comes up to you and shoves you in the shoulder. It’s really jarring.

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah, absolutely.

Veronique Ory
And it’s hard not to distract and look and see what just happened. And so as soon as she said that, I turned off all of my notifications of social media, of text messages, everything. I have my phone on do not disturb unless I’m expecting a specific message.

Gloria Grace Rand
Sure.

Veronique Ory
And that’s the yoga practice. Right. It’s like we’re in this conversation and we’re not simultaneously looking at our device. Exactly. Really distracting.

Gloria Grace Rand
Remember the old days when you could have a meal with someone and you weren’t checking your phone all the time because you didn’t frankly, have a phone with you? I remember those days.

Veronique Ory
It’s such a beautiful time. I know. I recently went on a ski trip, and it was the first time I had gone since I was 15 years old. And I was really struck by, oh, my gosh, if I lose the people I’m with, I can just text them. When I was a kid, you just had to meet at the ski lodge at some point. There was no way of contacting…

Gloria Grace Rand
That’s true.

Veronique Ory
Each other. And there’s a beauty in that. It’s like you somehow meet up. We don’t need to be in constant communication as much as we feel like we need to be. There’s a lot of liberation and letting go of being accessible all of the time.

Gloria Grace Rand
Exactly. Yeah.

Veronique Ory
There’s a really great sacred boundary that can be created for yourself so that when you decide that you are in connection with others and you’re really present versus sort of like, partly present all of the time through all the different possible ways that you could be connected to people.

Gloria Grace Rand
Yeah. And that’s a very important point to remember, is that we get to decide. I mean, okay, if you’re working for a boss and you have to be on call 24 hours a day or something, that’s different. But if you’re not in that type of a situation, you can control when you want to be available and when you don’t want to be available. And there’s nothing wrong with that because it’s your sanity. It’s your health and mental health as well as physical health that you need to focus on first and just know that it’s okay and people will survive if they can’t get a hold of you right away, and if it’s something that it is an emergency, then they’ll find a way to get a hold of you. It’ll be okay.

Veronique Ory
Yes, it’ll be okay.

Gloria Grace Rand
Oh, my goodness. This has been wonderful, and I’m so glad that I’ve had a chance to have you on the show today. You shared so much wonderful information and we could probably go on and talk for another half an hour easily.

However, I want to respect your time, respect the listeners time as well. So if someone is listening and I know those of you who are watching on YouTube, you got to see her website go by. But for those who are listening, can you share with folks how they can connect with you? What is your website?

Veronique Ory
Yes, my website is Yogawithveronique.com and it’s Spelt Veronique.com and I also am on Instagram at Veronique Ory and you can feel free to message me there if you have any questions. I love just to circle it back to the beginning. I love community, I love bringing us together and thank you for hosting this podcast, for this opportunity for us to connect and for all of our collective listeners to connect. It’s such a wonderful I like to think of it as a modern radio of we get the video and we get the audio and we get this collective this is a yoga practice, right, of listening and attentively learning something and coming together in this way. And so I think it’s really beautiful that we’re able to connect in this space. So if there was something that resonated with you and you want to share, I would love to hear from you. You can message me through my website or through Instagram. And I have a lot of resources on my website, the five minute morning routine which I mentioned, the access to my on demand channel, my book, and then there’s my YouTube station as well that has some tutorials and some classes on there as well. So feel free to reach out.

Gloria Grace Rand
I would love to connect, absolutely. And I will have all of that information in the show notes. So if you are listening somewhere where you don’t have a pen handy, not to worry, go to livelovengagepodcast.com and you’ll be able to find this episode and you’ll be able to get all of that information. So once again, thank you so much for being with us today. I really appreciate you taking time out of your day and spending it with our listeners and viewers. And you educated me, and I know you educated a lot of folks today.

Veronique Ory
Thank you so much. I really appreciate it.

Gloria Grace Rand
And I want to thank all of you for watching and for listening. If you’re not a subscriber yet, I encourage you to do that. That way you’ll be able to be notified when a new episode comes out. And we always like to hear comments. So if you’ve got anything positive to say, okay. If you have something negative to say too, I will take constructive criticism. But hopefully if you have something positive to say, that would be lovely too. You can reach out, comment on YouTube or comment on your favorite podcast platform like Apple or and because I do check those out and do read them and I appreciate them. And that’s going to do it for me for today. So until next time, go out and live fully, love deeply and engage authentically and.

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About the Author
Known as The Insightful Copywriter, Gloria Grace Rand is also an inspirational speaker, author and host of the Live. Love. Engage. podcast. Prior to launching her SEO Copywriting business in 2009, Gloria spent nearly two decades in television, most notably as writer and producer for the award-winning PBS financial news program, “Nightly Business Report.”

Gloria turned to writing as a way to communicate, since growing up with an alcoholic father and abusive mother taught her that it was safer to be seen and not heard. But not speaking her truth caused Gloria problems such as overeating, control issues, and an inability to fully trust people. After investing in coaching & personal development programs, and studying spiritual books like “A Course in Miracles,” Gloria healed her emotional wounds. Today, she helps entrepreneurs develop clarity, confidence and connection to the truth of who you are, so you can create a business that has more impact, influence and income!

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